Is It Time To (Re) Discover Our Creativity Through Learning?

Is It Time To (Re) Discover Our Creativity Through Learning?

Can you remember the last time you spontaneously burst into song or performed a pirouette in a supermarket aisle with your trolley when your favorite song came through the tannoy?

Or, do you remember the last time you felt like doing this and stopped yourself because it doesn’t meet with your perception of social norm?

As children we grow and develop without constraint. We laugh when it feels good, we dance to music only we can hear, and we skip because the road in front looks inviting.

Creativity is a natural instinctive desire that enjoys uninhibited freedom during childhood but often faces suppression as we get older.

The requirement in compulsory education to achieve archaic targets at the cost of natural creativity needs to be revisited and revised as a priority.

Math, English and Science are undoubtedly pivotal in society but why do we need to choose between these essential academic subjects and creativity?

Shouldn’t we encourage both?

Have you ever witnessed a child getting fidgety, or experienced this yourself?

Once our concentration wonders a change of activity is needed. Yes, as we get older it becomes easier to concentrate for longer periods but that doesn’t change our need for variety.

Expressing our creativity enhances cognition which in turn enhances creative thought that when applied to key academic subjects improves understanding, and interest.

Recognising the importance of complementary subjects in education including the arts and physical exercise and planning lessons to ensure the practical application of these subjects in academic study will provide a positive outlet for creativity and individual expression as well as supporting improved understanding and attainment of the key academic subjects.

This in turn will strengthen our confidence in being expressively creative as we grow and develop.

This however needs to be supported with a review of current target setting standards and the relentless focus on academic ability.

We owe it to our children to give them the best possible opportunities to creatively define their lives, and society will flourish through our efforts.

Why not give supermarket dancing a go, you won’t regret it!

I hope you have a great week

Cheers

Noel